Bobbi Kristina we will remember you always...Whitney your daughter we will always remember with you...Bobbi Kristina we will remember you always..May you rest in peace forever in your Mother's arms. Peace be to the Houston Family, Peace to the family of the Houstons,Peace be to the family and friends of Bobbi Kristina.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Monday, January 18, 2016

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Thursday, June 25, 2015

BOBBI KRISTINA The high Price of fame

 

BOBBI KRISTINA The high Price of fame


 



BOBBI KRISTINA The high Price of fame

It is now known life support is withdrawn from Kristina and she is in Hospice on the anniversary of her mother's death. How tragic and  I do not believe in coincidences.  A most famous mother and famous father drug addicts,domestic violence, what chance did Bobby really have I ask?
 I am hear broken as her mother went so she is  gone, There lies a body but her spirit is reunited with her mom.  I see a movie coming in this sadly. Do we in a society not learn. Is our our own lusts pleasures more important than our children? Drug addiction is poison effecting all even the innocent.  When as a society are we ever going to learn..............?


A lawyer for Bobby Brown just issued a statement, saying there is no truth to the story that Bobbi Kristina will be taken off life support Wednesday. As we reported, members of the Brown family informed us that was indeed the case. But the lawyer, Christopher Brown, says it's not so. 
update-grey-gray-bar
Bobbi Kristina will be taken off life support Wednesday ... on the 3rd anniversary of Whitney Houston's death ... TMZ has learned.
Brown family sources tell us Bobby has finally made the decision, realizing there is no hope for his 21-year-old daughter to recover.  
A source connected with Houston's family told TMZ on Sunday ... Cissy Houston, Whitney's mom, also wanted life support pulled on the anniversary to "bond mother and daughter for eternity." We have not confirmed this, but the NY Post ran the story Tuesday morning.
Members of the Brown family are extremely emotional, sobbing over the decision but realizing it's the right thing to do.
TMZ broke the story ... police have launched a criminal investigation because Bobbi Kristina had injuries on her body when she was rushed to the hospital and we're told the target of the investigation is her boyfriend, Nick Gordon.


Read more: http://www.tmz.com/2015/02/10/bobbi-kristina-life-support-withdrawn-pulled-die-whitney-houston/#ixzz3e4XojCkG
The price of fame can be high with an international study on Thursday finding that people who enjoy successful entertainment or sporting careers tend to die younger.

Researchers Richard Epstein and Catherine Epstein said the study, based on analysing 1,000 New York Times obituaries from 2009-2011, found film, music, stage performers and sports people died at an average age of 77.2 years.

This compared to an average lifespan of 78.5 years for creative workers, 81.7 for professionals and academics, and 83 years for people in business, military and political careers.

The Australian-based researchers said these earlier deaths could indicate that performers and sports stars took more risks in life, either to reach their goals or due to their success.

"Fame and achievement in performance-related careers may be earned at the cost of a shorter life expectancy," the researchers wrote in their study published in QJM: An International Journal of Medicine.

"In such careers, smoking and other risk behaviors may be either causes of effects of success and/or early death."


Britain's most high-profile celebrity publicist, Max Clifford, said the pressure that celebrities and sports stars put on themselves to succeed had to play a part, and even at the top they were always worried about who could replace them.

"People assume that fame and success is all about riches and happiness but as someone who has worked with famous people for 45 years I know that is not the case," Clifford told Reuters.

"The success becomes like a drug to them that they have to have and they are always worried about losing it so they push and push and work harder and harder. You have to be competitive in these fields otherwise it will not work."

WARNING TO ASPIRING STARS

For the study the researchers separated the obituaries by gender, age, and cause of death as well as by occupation, with anyone involved in sports, acting, singing, music or dance put into a performance category.

Others were split into creative roles such as writing and visual arts, into a business, military and political category, or a group of professional, academic and religious careers.

The study found that the list was heavily skewed towards men who accounted for 813 of the obituaries and the main causes of earlier deaths were linked to accidents, infections including HIV, and cancer.

Lung cancer deaths - which the authors considered a sign of chronic smoking - were most common in performers.

Richard Epstein, a director at the Kinghorn Cancer Centre at Sydney's St Vincent's Hospital, acknowledged that the one-off analysis could not prove anything but raised interesting questions.

"If it is true that successful performers and sports players tend to enjoy shorter lives, does this imply that fame at younger ages predisposes to poor health behaviors in later life after success has faded?" he said.

He suggested maybe psychological and family pressures favouring high public achievement could lead to self-destructive tendencies or that risk-taking personality traits maximized the chances of success, with the use of cigarettes, alcohol or illicit drugs improving performance output in the short-term.

"Any of these hypotheses could be viewed as a health warning to young people aspiring to become stars," he said.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/17/us-celebrities-deaths-idUSBRE93G1B820130417


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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Chinese Culture and Society



.Chinese Culture: Customs & Traditions of China
by Kim Ann Zimmermann, Live Science Contributor   |   January 20, 2015 10:03pm ET

China is an extremely large country, and the customs and traditions of its people vary by geography and ethnicity. 

More than 1 billion people live in China, according to the Asia Society, representing 56 ethnic minority groups. The largest group is the Han Chinese, with about 900 million people. Other groups include the Tibetans, the Mongols, the Manchus, the Naxi, and the Hezhen, which is smallest group, with fewer than 2,000 people.   

"Significantly, individuals within communities create their own culture," said Cristina De Rossi, an anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College in London. Culture includes religion, food, style, language, marriage, music, morals and many other things that make up how a group acts and interacts. Here is a brief overview of some elements of the Chinese culture.

Religion
The Chinese Communist Party that rules the nation is officially atheist, though it is gradually becoming more tolerant of religions, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Currently, there are only five official religions. Any religion other than Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Catholicism and Protestantism are illegal, even though the Chinese constitution states that people are allowed freedom of religion. The gradual tolerance of religion has only started to progress in the past few decades.

About a quarter of the people practice Taoism and Confucianism and other traditional religions. There are also small numbers of Buddhists, Muslims and Christians. Although numerous Protestant and Catholic ministries have been active in the country since the early 19th century, they have made little progress in converting Chinese to these religions.

Language
There are seven major groups of dialects of the Chinese language, which each have their own variations, according to Mount Holyoke College. Mandarin dialects are spoken by 71.5 percent of the population, followed by Wu (8.5 percent), Yue (also called Cantonese; 5 percent), Xiang (4.8 percent), Min (4.1 percent), Hakka (3.7 percent) and Gan (2.4 percent). 

Chinese dialects are very different, according to Jerry Norman, a former professor of linguistics at the University of Washington and author of "Chinese (Cambridge Language Surveys)" (Cambridge University Press, 1988). "Chinese is rather more like a language family than a single language made up of a number of regional forms," he wrote. "The Chinese dialectal complex is in many ways analogous to the Romance language family in Europe. To take an extreme example, there is probably as much difference between the dialects of Peking [Beijing] and Chaozhou as there is between Italian and French." 

The official national language of China is Pŭtōnghuà, a type of Mandarin spoken in the capital Beijing, according to the Order of the President of the People's Republic of China. Many Chinese are also fluent in English. 

Food
Like other aspects of Chinese life, cuisine is heavily influenced by geography and ethnic diversity. Among the main styles of Chinese cooking are Cantonese, which features stir-fried dishes, and Szechuan, which relies heavily on use of peanuts, sesame paste and ginger and is known for its spiciness.

Rice is not only a major food source in China; it is also a major element that helped grow their society, according to "Pathways to Asian Civilizations: Tracing the Origins and Spread of Rice and Rice Cultures," an 2011 article in the journal Rice by Dorian Q. Fuller. The Chinese word for rice is fan, which also means "meal," and it is a staple of their diet, as are bean sprouts, cabbage and scallions. Because they do not consume a lot of meat — occasionally pork or chicken — tofu is a main source of protein for the Chinese.

Religion
The Chinese Communist Party that rules the nation is officially atheist, though it is gradually becoming more tolerant of religions, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Currently, there are only five official religions. Any religion other than Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Catholicism and Protestantism are illegal, even though the Chinese constitution states that people are allowed freedom of religion. The gradual tolerance of religion has only started to progress in the past few decades.

About a quarter of the people practice Taoism and Confucianism and other traditional religions. There are also small numbers of Buddhists, Muslims and Christians. Although numerous Protestant and Catholic ministries have been active in the country since the early 19th century, they have made little progress in converting Chinese to these religions.

Language
There are seven major groups of dialects of the Chinese language, which each have their own variations, according to Mount Holyoke College. Mandarin dialects are spoken by 71.5 percent of the population, followed by Wu (8.5 percent), Yue (also called Cantonese; 5 percent), Xiang (4.8 percent), Min (4.1 percent), Hakka (3.7 percent) and Gan (2.4 percent). 

Chinese dialects are very different, according to Jerry Norman, a former professor of linguistics at the University of Washington and author of "Chinese (Cambridge Language Surveys)" (Cambridge University Press, 1988). "Chinese is rather more like a language family than a single language made up of a number of regional forms," he wrote. "The Chinese dialectal complex is in many ways analogous to the Romance language family in Europe. To take an extreme example, there is probably as much difference between the dialects of Peking [Beijing] and Chaozhou as there is between Italian and French." 

The official national language of China is Pŭtōnghuà, a type of Mandarin spoken in the capital Beijing, according to the Order of the President of the People's Republic of China. Many Chinese are also fluent in English. 

Food
Like other aspects of Chinese life, cuisine is heavily influenced by geography and ethnic diversity. Among the main styles of Chinese cooking are Cantonese, which features stir-fried dishes, and Szechuan, which relies heavily on use of peanuts, sesame paste and ginger and is known for its spiciness.

Rice is not only a major food source in China; it is also a major element that helped grow their society, according to "Pathways to Asian Civilizations: Tracing the Origins and Spread of Rice and Rice Cultures," an 2011 article in the journal Rice by Dorian Q. Fuller. The Chinese word for rice is fan, which also means "meal," and it is a staple of their diet, as are bean sprouts, cabbage and scallions. Because they do not consume a lot of meat — occasionally pork or chicken — tofu is a main source of protein for the Chinese.





 


 


  





QIN DYNASTY CONSTRUCTION
Though the beginning of the Great Wall of China can be traced to the third century B.C., many of the fortifications included in the wall date from hundreds of years earlier, when China was divided into a number of individual kingdoms during the so-called Warring States Period. Around 220 B.C., Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of a unified China, ordered that earlier fortifications between states be removed and a number of existing walls along the northern border be joined into a single system that would extend for more than 10,000 li (a li is about one-third of a mile) and protect China against attacks from the north.

Did You Know?
When Emperor Qin Shi Huang ordered construction of the Great Wall around 221 B.C., the labor force that built the wall was made up largely of soldiers and convicts. It is said that as many as 400,000 people died during the wall's construction; many of these workers were buried within the wall itself.

Construction of the “Wan Li Chang Cheng,” or 10,000-Li-Long Wall, was one of the most ambitious building projects ever undertaken by any civilization. The famous Chinese general Meng Tian directed the project, and was said to have used a massive army of soldiers, convicts and commoners as workers. Made mostly of earth and stone, the wall stretched from the China Sea port of Shanhaiguan over 3,000 miles west into Gansu province. In some strategic areas, sections of the wall overlapped for maximum security (including the Badaling stretch, north of Beijing, that was later restored by the Ming dynasty). From a base of 15 to 50 feet, the Great Wall rose some 15-30 feet high and was topped by ramparts 12 feet or higher; guard towers were distributed at intervals along it.

THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA THROUGH THE CENTURIES
With the death of Qin Shi Huang and the fall of the Qin dynasty, much of the Great Wall fell into disrepair. After the fall of the Han dynasty (206 B.C.-220 A.D.), a series of frontier tribes seized control in northern China. The most powerful of these was the Northern Wei dynasty (386-535 A.D.), which repaired and extended the existing wall to defend against attacks from other tribes. The Bei Qi kingdom (550–577) built or repaired more than 900 miles of wall, and the short-lived but effective Sui dynasty (581–618) repaired and extended the Great Wall of China a number of times.

With the fall of the Sui and the rise of the Tang dynasty (618-907), the Great Wall lost its importance as a fortification, as China had defeated the Tujue tribe to the north and expanded past the original frontier protected by the wall. During the Song dynasty (960-1279), the Chinese were forced to withdraw under threat from the Liao and Jin peoples to the north, who took over many areas on both sides of the Great Wall. The powerful Yuan (Mongol) dynasty (1206-1368) established by Genghis Khan eventually controlled all of China, parts of Asia and sections of Europe. Though the Great Wall held little importance for the Mongols as a military fortification, soldiers were assigned to man the wall in order to protect merchants and caravans traveling along the profitable trade routes established during this period.

WALL BUILDING DURING THE MING DYNASTY
Despite its long history, the Great Wall of China as it is exists today was constructed mainly during the mighty Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Like the Mongols, the early Ming rulers had little interest in building border fortifications, and wall building was limited before the late 15th century. In 1421, the Ming emperor Yongle proclaimed China’s new capital, Beijing, on the site of the former Mongol city of Dadu. Under the strong hand of the Ming rulers, Chinese culture flourished, and the period saw an immense amount of construction in addition to the Great Wall, including bridges, temples and pagodas. The construction of the Great Wall as it is known today began around 1474. After an initial phase of territorial expansion, Ming rulers took a largely defensive stance, and their reformation and extension of the Great Wall was key to this strategy.

The Ming wall extended from the Yalu River in Liaoning Province to the eastern bank of the Taolai River in Gansu Province, and winded its way from east to west through today’s Liaoning, Hebei, Tianjin, Beijing, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi, Shaanxi, Ningxia and Gansu.

Starting west of Juyong Pass, the Great Wall was split into south and north lines, respectively named the Inner and Outer Walls. Strategic “passes” (i.e., fortresses) and gates were placed along the wall; the Juyong, Daoma and Zijing passes, closest to Beijing, were named the Three Inner Passes, while further west were Yanmen, Ningwu and Piantou, the Three Outer Passes. All six passes were heavily garrisoned during the Ming period and considered vital to the defense of the capital.

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA
In the mid-17th century, the Manchus from central and southern Manchuria broke through the Great Wall and encroached on Beijing, eventually forcing the fall of the Ming dynasty and beginning of the Qing (Manchu) dynasty (1644-1912). Between the 18th and 20th centuries, the Great Wall emerged as the most common emblem of China for the Western world, and a symbol both physical–a manifestation of Chinese strength–and psychological–a representation of the barrier maintained by the Chinese state to repel foreign influences and exert control over its citizens.

Today, the Great Wall is generally recognized as one of the most impressive architectural feats in history. In 1987, UNESCO designated the Great Wall a World Heritage site, and a popular claim that emerged in the 20th century holds that it is the only manmade structure that is visible from the moon. Over the years, roadways have been cut through the wall in various points, and many sections have deteriorated after centuries of neglect. The best-known section of the Great Wall of China–Badaling, located 43 miles (70 km) northwest of Beijing–was rebuilt in the late 1950s, and attracts thousands of national and foreign tourists every day. 

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Japanese Komono





  

 Originally, "kimono" was the Japanese word for clothing. But in more recent years, the word has been used to refer specifically to traditional Japanese clothing. Kimonos as we know them today came into being during the Heian period (794-1192).From the Nara period (710-794) until then, Japanese people typically wore either ensembles consisting of separate upper and lower garments (trousers or skirts), or one-piece garments. But in the Heian period, a new kimono-making technique was developed. Known as the straight-line-cut method, it involved cutting pieces of fabric in straight lines and sewing them together. With this technique, kimono makers did not have to concern themselves with the shape of the wearer's body.Straight-line-cut kimonos offered many advantages. They were easy to fold. They were also suitable for all weather: They could be worn in layers to provide warmth in winter, and kimonos made of breathable fabric such as linen were comfortable in summer. These advantages helped kimonos become part of Japanese people's everyday lives.Over time, as the practice of wearing kimonos in layers came into fashion, Japanese people began paying attention to how kimonos of different colors looked together, and they developed a heightened sensitivity to color. Typically, color combinations represented either seasonal colors or the political class to which one belonged. It was during this time that what we now think of as traditional Japanese color combinations developed.During the Kamakura period (1192-1338) and the Muromachi period (1338-1573), both men and women wore brightly colored kimonos. Warriors dressed in colors representing their leaders, and sometimes the battlefield was as gaudy as a fashion show.During the Edo period (1603-1868), the Tokugawa warrior clan ruled over Japan. The country was divided up into feudal domains ruled by lords. The samurais of each domain wore identified by the colors and patterns of their "uniforms." They consisted of three parts: a kimono; a sleeveless garment known as a kamishimo worn over the kimono; and a hakama, a trouser-like split skirt. The kamishimo was made of linen, starched to make the shoulders stand out. With so many samurai clothes to make, kimono makers got better and better at their craft, and kimono making grew into an art form. Kimonos became more valuable, and parents handed them down to their children as family heirlooms.During the Meiji period (1868-1912), Japan was heavily influenced by foreign cultures. The government encouraged people to adopt Western clothing and habits. Government officials and military personnel were required by law to wear Western clothing for official functions. (That law is no longer in effect today.) For ordinary citizens, wearing kimonos on formal occasions were required to use garments decorated with the wearer's family crest, which identified his or her family background.Nowadays, Japanese people rarely wear kimonos in everyday life, reserving them for such occasions as weddings, funerals, tea ceremonies, or other special events, such as summer festivals.Illustrations and photos (from top): Typical Japanese looks in the Nara, Heian, and Kamakura periods (© Chitose Yamada); kamishimo are worn to this day by noh actors, and many women wear kimonos when they go to see a kabuki show (courtesy of Hisako Nakatani)..

Japanese Society

 


Japan - Language, Culture, Customs and Etiquette

Japanese FlagWelcome to our guide to Japan. This is useful for anyone researching Japanese culture, customs, manners, etiquette, values and wanting to understand the people better. You may be going to Japan on business, for a visit or even hosting Japanese colleagues or clients in your own country. Remember this is only a very basic level introduction and is not meant to stereotype all Japanese people you may meet!
Facts and Statistics


Location: Eastern Asia, island chain between the North Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan/East Sea, east of the Korean Peninsula. 

Capital: Tokyo 

Population: 127,333,002 (July 2004 est.) 

Ethnic Make-up: Japanese 99%, others 1% (Korean 511,262, Chinese 244,241, Brazilian 182,232, Filipino 89,851, other 237,914) 

Religions: observe both Shinto and Buddhist 84%, other 16% (including Christian 0.7%) 

The Japanese Language

Japanese is the sixth most spoken language in the world, with over 99% percent of the country's population using it.  Amazingly, the language is spoken in scarcely any region outside Japan.  

The origin of the Japanese language has many theories in reference to it, some believe it is similar to the Altaic languages, namely Turkish or Mongolian. It is recognized and acknowledged to be close in syntax to the Korean language. 

Dialects are used in areas, particularly in Kyoto and Osaka, but standard Japanese, based on the speech of Tokyo, has become more popular through the use of television, radio and movies.


Map of Japan


Japanese Society & Culture    The Japanese and 'Face'


Saving face is crucial in Japanese society.
The Japanese believe that turning down someone's request causes embarrassment and loss of face to the other person.
If the request cannot be agreed to, they will say, 'it's inconvenient' or 'it's under consideration'.
Face is a mark of personal dignity and means having high status with one's peers.
The Japanese will try never to do anything to cause loss of face.
Therefore, they do not openly criticize, insult, or put anyone on-the-spot.
Face can be lost, taken away, or earned through praise and thanks.

Harmony in Japanese Society

Harmony is the key value in Japanese society.
Harmony is the guiding philosophy for the Japanese in family and business settings and in society as a whole.
Japanese children are taught to act harmoniously and cooperatively with others from the time they go to pre-school.
The Japanese educational system emphasizes the interdependence of all people, and Japanese children are not raised to be independent but rather to work together.
This need for harmonious relationships between people is reflected in much Japanese behaviour.
They place great emphasis on politeness, personal responsibility and working together for the universal, rather than the individual, good.
They present facts that might be disagreeable in a gentle and indirect fashion.
They see working in harmony as the crucial ingredient for working productively.

Japanese Non-Verbal Communication

Since the Japanese strive for harmony and are group dependent, they rely on facial expression, tone of voice and posture to tell them what someone feels.
They often trust non-verbal messages more than the spoken word as words can have several meanings.
The context in which something is said affects the meaning of the words. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the situation to fully appreciate the response.
Frowning while someone is speaking is interpreted as a sign of disagreement.
Most Japanese maintain an impassive expression when speaking.
Expressions to watch out for include inhaling through clenched teeth, tilting the head, scratching the back of the head, and scratching the eyebrow.
Non-verbal communication is so vital that there is a book for 'gaijins' (foreigners) on how to interpret the signs!
It is considered disrespectful to stare into another person's eyes, particularly those of a person who is senior to you because of age or status.
In crowded situations the Japanese avoid eye contact to give themselves privacy.

Japanese Hierarchy

The Japanese are very conscious of age and status.
Everyone has a distinct place in the hierarchy, be it the family unit, the extended family, a social or a business situation.
At school children learn to address other students as senior to them ('senpai') or junior to them ('kohai').
The oldest person in a group is always revered and honoured. In a social situation, they will be served first and their drinks will be poured for them.
Etiquette & Customs in Japan


Meeting Etiquette

Greetings in Japan are very formal and ritualized.
It is important to show the correct amount of respect and deference to someone based upon their status relative to your own.
If at all possible, wait to be introduced.
It can be seen as impolite to introduce yourself, even in a large gathering.
While foreigners are expected to shake hands, the traditional form of greeting is the bow. How far you bow depends upon your relationship to the other person as well as the situation. The deeper you bow, the more respect you show.
A foreign visitor ('gaijin') may bow the head slightly, since no one expects foreigners to generally understand the subtle nuances of bowing.

Gift Giving Etiquette

Gift-giving is highly ritualistic and meaningful.
The ceremony of presenting the gift and the way it is wrapped is as important--sometimes more important--than the gift itself.
Gifts are given for many occasions.
The gift need not be expensive, but take great care to ask someone who understands the culture to help you decide what type of gift to give.
Good quality chocolates or small cakes are good ideas.
Do not give lilies, camellias or lotus blossoms as they are associated with funerals.
Do not give white flowers of any kind as they are associated with funerals.
Do not give potted plants as they encourage sickness, although a bonsai tree is always acceptable.
Give items in odd numbers, but not 9.
If you buy the gift in Japan, have it wrapped.
Pastel colours are the best choices for wrapping paper.
Gifts are not opened when received.

 Dining Etiquette

On the rare occasion you are invited to a Japanese house:

Remove your shoes before entering and put on the slippers left at the doorway.
Leave your shoes pointing away from the doorway you are about to walk through.
Arrive on time or no more than 5 minutes late if invited for dinner.
If invited to a large social gathering, arriving a little bit later than the invitation is acceptable, although punctuality is always appreciated.
Unless you have been told the event is casual, dress as if you were going into the office.
If you must go to the toilet, put on the toilet slippers and remove them when you are finished.

Watch your Table Manners!

Wait to be told where to sit. There is a protocol to be followed.
The honoured guest or the eldest person will be seated in the centre of the table the furthest from the door.
The honoured guest or the eldest is the first person to begin eating.
Never point your chopsticks.
It will yield tremendous dividends if you learn to use chopsticks.
Do not pierce your food with chopsticks.
Chopsticks should be returned to the chopstick rest after every few bites and when you drink or stop to speak.
Do not cross your chopsticks when putting them on the chopstick rest.
Place bones on the side of your plate.
Try a little bit of everything. It is acceptable to ask what something is and even to make a face if you do not like the taste.
Don't be surprised if your Japanese colleagues slurp their noodles and soup.
 Mixing other food with rice is usually not done. You eat a bit of one and then a bit of the other, but they should never be mixed together as you do in many Western countries.
If you do not want anything more to drink, do not finish what is in your glass. An empty glass is an invitation for someone to serve you more.
When you have finished eating, place your chopsticks on the chopstick rest or on the table. Do not place your chopsticks across the top of your bowl.
If you leave a small amount of rice in your bowl, you will be given more. To signify that you do not want more rice, finish every grain in your bowl.
It is acceptable to leave a small amount of food on your plate when you have finished eating.
Conversation at the table is generally subdued. The Japanese like to savour their food.
Source- http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/japan-country-profiles.html